Luxury Travel, Lifestyle and Marketing Trends

Key Takeaways from Travel Blogger Exchange ’15

tbex

Key takeaways from the recent TBEX(Travel Blogger Exchange) North America 2015 Conference in Fort Lauderdale. Attracting an international group of travel bloggers, writers, new media content creators, and social media savvy travel industry professionals, TBEX  is the world’s largest conference and networking event for online travel journalists and travel industry companies. Facts, figures, and tips to keep in mind:

Key Takeaways

  • Why Travel Brands Must Embrace Visual Storytelling
    • Data shows that 71% of travelers search for a destination on YouTube before booking to see the visual appeal
    • Good examples of brands using the tools of video and photography to their advantage:
      • Marriott created a GoPro rental package and encouraged guests to videotape their trip
      • The 1888 Hotel in Sydney allowed for anyone with over 50,000 Instagram followers to have a free night (because they have such a large visual following.)
  • Have brand hashtags readily available for guests to access (no longer than 15 characters)
  • Less than 10% of travel brands have videos on their Facebook – this is a huge opportunity for brands to expand upon
  • Platforms to utilize social media:
    • Socialbakers monitors how the competition promotes their content, how it performs, and start reaching bigger audience on social
    • Periscope is an emerging video social platform brands should begin utilizing

 

Working with Travel Bloggers from a Company Perspective

  • Pin articles to a brand’s Pinterest account to expand their reach
  • Airlines will very rarely comp flights because of the margin
  • Bloggers want evergreen content that will continue to generate impressions (a win/win for a company because they will generate sales)
  • Blogs are the third most influential digital resources (31%) when making overall purchases, behind retail sites (56%) and brand sites (34%) according to Technorati
  • “Nearly half of travelers have changed or decided upon a trip because of what they read on social media” – WTTC

 

Travel Reviews

  • Everything is based on a review in this day and age
  • We live in a review culture (i.e. someone looks to their favorite travel blog for hotel recommendations)
  • Credibility is the number one factor of bloggers gaining readers, developing their voice and showing their professionalism
  • As part of a blogger’s editing checklist, they want to be a correct resource (i.e. it’s OK as a brand/PR representative to ask them to correct a story if the information is out of date)

Photo courtesy of www.fathomaway.com

Men Circa 2015 and the Travel Industry

domenico vacca club

Domenico Vacca’s new club

Remember when “metrosexual” was news, defined as” an urban heterosexual male given to enhancing his personal appearance by fastidious grooming, beauty treatments, and fashionable clothes”? That was in the early 2000’s . In a little over a decade businesses are finally starting to go all out with products and services to meet the interest and need. And men are more comfortable showing their “metrosexual” side. There are major implications here for new products and marketing, and some savvy retailers – but not as yet the travel and hotel business – are getting on the bandwagon.

Let’s speak first about the settings for the delivery of these goods and services. Traditionally you’ve had men’s social, athletic and university clubs, but they’re about socializing and possibly networking, though some have accommodations that are pretty basic. Little or nothing in retail, grooming or heaven forbid pampering services. Enter opportunity.

This fall in New York Italian fashion designer Domenico Vacca is opening a 12 story luxury lifestyle destination that New York Racked called “a Carnival for the one percent”. Not only will it have a flagship retail store for men and women, but a barber shop, gym, long stay residences, Italian café, and a social club/lounge you can belong to for $20K a year. Though there are facilities for women too, the pitch as seen in the images and décor is very much directed to men. I heard there’s another strictly men’s luxury destination on the way from a publisher no less. Stay tuned.

All too often men’s pampering and fashion offerings are done as an afterthought, not getting “equal time” or thought out as those for women. It takes a mindset – to look at everything directed to women buyers and travelers and say what’s the outtake for men. For instance, two years ago we launched a handbag bar at our all inclusive client Casa Velas in Puerto Vallarta. Designer handbags are offered on loan to guests for the evening. It was a big hit, and we decided to expand it this year and are offering a “Murse” – men’s purse, MontBlanc no less (it’s a luxury resort). A small thing, but it makes a statement.

So many luxury hotels and cruise ships have spas with beauty salons but how many have barber shops or pitch men’s grooming? And spa treatments for men can be found on menus, but they almost seem like lip service. Or how about men’s getaways? Aren’t there more creative possibilities than golf and boating?

You men out there, what do you think? What would you like to see?

Baby Boomers and Retirement Niches

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Arguably the most well traveled generation in American history, Baby Boomers, used to the new and different weren’t content with the same old, same old. They helped propel the niche economy, facilitated by technology. We’ve seen everything from special interest cruises and tours to dating sites and ever more niche culinary sensations which we’ve written about over the years. It’s no surprise, then, that in their retirement, boomers are looking for senior-oriented communities to pursue their special interests with the like minded and to be more active in body, mind and soul. And their numbers and healthy assets are propelling a growth in this newest niche.

True, some sports oriented communities like golf and polo have been around for decades. The differences now are that interests are a function of everything from sexual orientation to a wide range of passions and hobbies. Think LGBT focused communities and university based enclaves where residents take classes and have access to skilled nursing care. Others are devoted to the arts such as the NoHo Senior artists Colony apartments in North Hollywood, California with classes in collage construction, creative dance and screenwriting. Probably one of the most unusual is Escapees Care Center in Livingston, Texas, for those with an interest in recreational vehicles and onsite medical treatment.

But don’t think these come cheap. At one multi generational community called NewBridge on the Charles entrance fee for independent living apartments range from $600,000 to $1.3 million besides monthly expenses. The fee is 90 percent refundable but it’s still a major outlay and isn’t risk free.

With the market potential in numbers and price tag, it’s a sure bet to conclude these kind of communities will grow. What’s the next niche?

In an article in the New York Times, Max Greenberg, a senior living adviser and senior real estate specialist in Palo Alto, California predicts we’ll see ones run by large national fraternities and sororities “allowing seniors to once again experience the partying, socialization and spirit of frat life they had in collage. I wouldn’t be surprised to see a Grateful Dead oriented community sprout up in the Bay Area, “he concluded.

Culinary Tourism Trends: What’s In and Out

Eat With ; Hummus Brunch with Naama Shefi & Noam Bonnie ; Photo By: Eilon Paz

Make no mistake about it, culinary tourism is booming. It’s now a mature special interest category which brings with it higher expectations for novelty, creativity, and innovative offerings. Cooking and mixology classes, food and wine pairings, and food festivals seem so, well, yesterday. Here’s a look at what was and what’s now.

 

THEN NOW
Cooking classes Behind the scenes with the chef
Wine tastings Hot sauce or other specialty food tastings
Eating local Eating with locals in their homes or outside venues (e.g. mama cooks, eat with a local)
Group food tours Personalized dining itineraries based on food preferences, traveling configurations, budget
World’s Fair with Food Courts Food themed world’s fair (Milan Expo 2015)
Chef driven menus Crowd sourced menus
Dining as party Dining and conversation (“silence is the new luxury”)

 

And in the category of dining trends, it’s important to not leave out gluten free. Any major restaurant has to cater to the needs of gluten free diners. Not only is it expected, but the absence of sensitivity to these special needs loses business and also makes a statement about service.

It’s interesting that in two restaurant visits in Miami in the past 45 days, one to a multi million dollar upscale restaurant operated by an international group, there were only two items on a multi page menu for gluten free. I was with a group of 8 and the diner walked out. In another case, another high-end restaurant, the waiter and kitchen staff had obviously not been trained about this special needs group. Take note!

Photo courtesy of Travel and Leisure