Luxury Travel, Lifestyle and Marketing Trends

Zika Virus, Travel Security and PR

zika virus

In this age of global terrorism and most recently, the Zika virus, what’s the best way to handle communication about traveler security?

Here are guidelines from KWE Partners’ President & Chief Strategist Karen Weiner Escalera on public relations do’s and don’ts as reported in an article in Hotel News Now.

The most important thing not to do is send out news releases talking about a hotel’s safety and security measures, said Karen Weiner Escalera, president and chief strategist for KWE Partners. All that serves to do is remind people or alert them to the fact there are issues, she said. “For people who might otherwise not have known, it could serve to alarm them, which is the opposite of what a hotel would want to achieve,” she said.

Instead of creating a news release or email blast, hoteliers should prepare a statement to use if guests or potential guests contact the hotel with questions, she said. “The goal is not to broadcast but be ready with a statement if and when there are inquiries,” she said.

In a recent project for a resort group in Mexico, Escalera said her team prepared a letter to send to tour operators and agents to inform people asking about what the property was doing to eradicate mosquitos on the grounds to prevent spread of the Zika virus. There was also a version of the letter for the sales center and contact centers, she said.

“It’s also extremely important to advise everyone in the sales and marketing team of what the statement is,” she said. “Internal communication is critical. That’s where you’re proactive: internally.” Along with the letter explaining the resort’s efforts, Escalera said, it also explained specifically there were no reported problems at the destination.


Full Article: Hoteliers must be subtle in marketing security (Hotels News Now)

Image courtesy of The Daily Mail, UK

Fashion and Travel Branding

fashion and travel branding

Fashion has been used for some time  as an upscale or luxury branding tool in travel, especially for hotels and airlines. But in a new twist, we see an effective example of what it can do for a destination with Shinola and Detroit.

Big name designers have been leaving their mark on uniforms for years with airlines and hotels. Luxury designers from Armani to Versace and Missoni brand hotels and spearhead all aspects of design and sometimes even dining. Then we have had fashions made exclusively for resorts such as the  Christian Louboutin espadrilles for One & Only Palmilla , fashion popups to generate buzz and new customers, and boutiques that are destinations in themselves.  Interestingly enough, cruise lines have been slow to embrace this marketing and sales opportunity for some reason (any ideas why?).

fashion and travel branding

Now, hello fashion and destination marketing. Shinola which makes watches, high end bikes (think $2950 for a city bike) and classic design leather goods, has an advertising program that touts its Made in Detroit  roots. It plays on authenticity and a cool factor that also works to be a symbol of Detroit’s renaissance.  The graphic design of the ad campaign is sleek, classic contemporary, and pops.

fashion and travel branding

In Miami, home of its newest store, ad agency Partners & Spade opted for large placements as in full page ads, digital advertising and wall ads you could see from the highway. Photography is by the iconic Bruce Weber.  And the Miami shop was very well chosen to be in the hip artist district of Wynwood, best known for its street art. The bottom line: it’s effective in branding Detroit, heralding its rebirth, and imparting an image that’s at the same time classic and hip.  With revenues of $60 million in 2014, Shinola has also contributed jobs to the city’s rebirth. A win win for all. For more about Shinola, check out this article in the New York Times, “Detroit Cool Hits the Road”.