Luxury Travel, Lifestyle and Marketing Trends

Behind the Scenes Travel Experiences

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It’s natural to think, who would be interested in a behind the scenes look at the engine room of a cruise ship? Or a look at the housekeeping department of a hotel? The answer, a lot of people. One of the favorite pastimes of cruise ship passengers at Carnival is the engine room tour.

In this day and age when all surveys point to an interest in travel experiences, certainly up there at the top are opportunities to see what is happening behind the scenes. This works not only for travelers, but also, for luxury brands in particular. It’s an opportunity to demonstrate craftsmanship, artisanry, expertise. A company that really gets the value of this is LVMH. And when they get behind a concept, they go all the way.

Case in point, in 2011 they launched what they called Open Days in which 25 of their brands from Dior to Dom Perignon opened their usually closed ateliers to the public. Tickets were free, but reservations were necessary. As reported in the New York Times, in year one 6,000 spaces allotted for Louis Vuitton’s workshop in Asnieres were taken within 90 seconds of release; for the Christian Dior Couture atelier it took 3 minutes to fill. They wrote, “From Paris to Poland, where Belvedere vodka is based, some 100,000 people attended the first open atelier weekend. Last year, the total was 120,000 and a third weekend is planned for 2015.”

This is obviously a low cost/no cost initiative and one most products and services could be able to do. Love to hear any behind the scenes offerings you do at your firm.

Photo courtesy of www.nytimes.com

What Millennials Want: Live Branding Case Study

Amherst College

Amherst College

The always innovative Frits Van Paasschen, CEO of Starwood Hotels and Resorts, commissioned a study of marketing and branding trends with students at Amherst College. The target market was young adults. The “Live Branding Case Study” was a first for Amherst, his alma mater, and a first for Starwood who has only worked with hospitality schools in the past. Among the questions were “What are your generation’s biggest concerns?”” How will these influence your purchasing behavior”, and “What three initiatives would you commission if you were Starwood’s CEO”?

Survey results revealed that millennials put a premium on businesses that embrace technology and environmental sustainability along with social responsibility in general. This smartphone bred generation wants more from hotel mobile apps, like being able to order room service even while on the plane with a touch of a button, or being able to network with other travelers. The students encouraged hotels to look beyond the onsite facilities to events like in house art galleries, concerts, book clubs and meetings. And what is probably no surprise, the importance of design as an end in ltself, part of the experience.

The insights are valuable but I think what’s most interesting is the idea of going to a liberal arts college to do what they billed as a “Live Branding Case Study”. As described by the editor in an article in Amherst College’s magazine, Van Paasschen wanted to leverage the interdisciplinary nature of a liberal arts education and students’ interests ranging from fashion, real estate and finance to media and contemporary art. The Starwood CEO  said this will be the first of other similar studies, and I’m sure many other hotel companies will follow their lead. Interested in reading more about millennials and marketing? Check out our Luxury Travel and Lifestyle Trends newsletters.