Luxury Travel, Lifestyle and Marketing Trends

Zika Virus, Travel Security and PR

zika virus

In this age of global terrorism and most recently, the Zika virus, what’s the best way to handle communication about traveler security?

Here are guidelines from KWE Partners’ President & Chief Strategist Karen Weiner Escalera on public relations do’s and don’ts as reported in an article in Hotel News Now.

The most important thing not to do is send out news releases talking about a hotel’s safety and security measures, said Karen Weiner Escalera, president and chief strategist for KWE Partners. All that serves to do is remind people or alert them to the fact there are issues, she said. “For people who might otherwise not have known, it could serve to alarm them, which is the opposite of what a hotel would want to achieve,” she said.

Instead of creating a news release or email blast, hoteliers should prepare a statement to use if guests or potential guests contact the hotel with questions, she said. “The goal is not to broadcast but be ready with a statement if and when there are inquiries,” she said.

In a recent project for a resort group in Mexico, Escalera said her team prepared a letter to send to tour operators and agents to inform people asking about what the property was doing to eradicate mosquitos on the grounds to prevent spread of the Zika virus. There was also a version of the letter for the sales center and contact centers, she said.

“It’s also extremely important to advise everyone in the sales and marketing team of what the statement is,” she said. “Internal communication is critical. That’s where you’re proactive: internally.” Along with the letter explaining the resort’s efforts, Escalera said, it also explained specifically there were no reported problems at the destination.


Full Article: Hoteliers must be subtle in marketing security (Hotels News Now)

Image courtesy of The Daily Mail, UK

Hotel as Sanctuary

Silence is the new luxury. My prediction: a new hotel trend 2015. Why? Advertising is everywhere — big, bold and bolder. On floor tiles in some supermarkets, turnstiles in New York subways, plastered even on high end residential buildings and, of course what I find especially distasteful, totally covering public buses. Then there are the growing traffic jams in urban centers, technology that’s in your face, and restaurant music which is more about disco decibels than for dining. I was thinking about this on a recent trip to New York and how, in this climate of urban sensory assault, a growing group of travelers are increasingly going to want their hotel to be a sanctuary, and their restaurant to follow in the same vein.

Not much hotel copy talks about things like windows that seal out the street noise, use the word “serenity” or a synonym, or address décor that’s soothing, except for maybe wellness or yoga retreats and Westin’s wellness rooms. But all of these qualities will soon be strong selling points, just as “digital detox” programs and offerings are growing.

Singapore based COMO Hotels “gets it”. In South Beach, where most  restaurants are places  where it’s almost de rigeur to have a party atmosphere otherwise called “buzzy”, they’ve taken a whole different tack at The Metropolitan by COMO. “Silence is a luxury” said their spokesperson about their Traymore Restaurant. “We want people to be able to talk to one another rather than the experience being about seeing and being seen”, he continued. The décor as well is expressive of this approach: cool whites and gray, quietly elegant and sophisticated. The music is there, loungey and just the right volume. Hopefully COMO will kick off a new trend.