Luxury Travel, Lifestyle and Marketing Trends

Maximize PR from a Celebrity Visit

How to maximize public relations coverage from a past celebrity visit beyond mentioning the name in a description of the hotel’s  or cruise ship’s history? The Fontainebleau Miami Beach has come up with a terrific promotion that could be a case study, around Frank Sinatra’s centennial birthday. Granted, every celebrity doesn’t have the high wattage of “Ol’ Blue Eyes” and it does help that there’s a recent, very successful three part TV series about his life (fascinating, see it). But there are takeaway elements that can be applied to lesser celebs as well. Here’s the scoop:

The hotel is doing a 100 day countdown to Sinatra’s 100th birthday, kicking off September 2. They’re using it to reinforce the image of the Fontainebleau’s “Golden Era glamour”. A highlight will be an exclusive photo exhibit curated by Sinatra’s family and 1966 Americas of personal and historic images. In the iconic Bleau Bar (a favorite of mine)

Bleau Bar

Bleau Bar

guests will be invited to enjoy a sample of Jack Daniel’s Sinatra Select whiskey as they toast to Sinatra’s upcoming birthday. Additionally, the hotel will also debut unique in-room amenities and packages inspired by the man, while the signature restaurants will pay homage to Sinatra’s favorite meals at the Fontainebleau including throwback, 1950’s-inspired ‘Brunch with Frank’ menus, cocktails and intimate dinners.

For guests who want to ‘Live Like Frank’, there will be a Sinatra-inspired package for $1,915, commemorating the year Frank was born. The package will include a two-night stay in a junior suite or above, a vintage Fontainebleau canvas bag, a Fontainebleau Luxury Art Book, one bottle of Jack Daniel’s Sinatra Select, daily breakfast for two, two 50-minute ‘Fly Me To The Moon’ massages at Lapis Spa, a $250 credit for dinner for two  at one of four signature restaurants and the ‘Ultimate Sinatra’ CD featuring the singer’s greatest hits.

The 100 day countdown culminates with a performance honoring Sinatra’s legacy. The performance act will be announced at a later date.

The New Hotel Grab n’ Go, Food Courts?

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Food courts are a whole new breed these days, even in airports. I just returned from Europe with flights through Rome’s Fiumicino and Lisbon’s International airports and, to my delight, found appealing options in the food courts . People like them – the variety, speedy service for our time pressed society, the ability to see exactly what you’re getting, and the modest price point.

Then there are the fancy ones, like the new Gourmet Experience at Madrid’s Corte Ingles which touts the 7 Michelin stars the chefs have in their food court, or the new food hall in Paris’ Galeries Lafayette with outposts of food purveyors from Petrossian to 5 Jotas Spanish ham. To be sure, Berlin’s Ka Da We department store led the way a number of years ago with their full floor of grazing options, a destination in its own right. But what is different is the rapid expansion of the concept in number of venues, kinds of places they’re landing, and the ever rising bar on standards, even at the lowest common denominator (airports).

Now, real estate developers are putting them into renovated buildings as an amenity, betting on companies’ desire to attract millennial workers who grew up on food courts. Example: the owners of the 41-story glassy former home to AIG on 180 Maiden Lane, as part of a $100 million upgrade are putting in a high end food court and a lobby with picnic tables.

What is next in hotel food and beverage trends? I predict that midrange and/or convention hotels will turn to food courts both as a point of difference and to not only lower food costs, but also, as a new profit center coming from leasing the spaces.

What do you think?

5 Not so Obvious Do’s and Don’ts with Bloggers

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Though I’ve had KWE Partners blog for many years, mostly a B2B audience, being on the consumer blogging side with MiamiCurated (69K+ UVM according to Cision media database) has opened my eyes to several Best Practices that are often overlooked by products and services. Here are 5 tips from my first hand experience:

 

  • Do not prohibit bloggers from taking photos or require them to get approvals from PR execs to take them. This might seem obvious in a social media world, but it isn’t in practice. Case in point. As a courtesy, I always introduce myself when I go to a place and want to take pictures. The other day I went to a men’s shoe store, spoke with the manager, introduced myself, and proceeded to take pictures. He said I wasn’t permitted without getting the PR department’s approval. No writeup for them.
  • Recently I learned of a blogger’s loyalty program to encourage purchases of the product. What a wonderful idea. Think of giving a discount to bloggers who sign up as a perk – you’ll earn their appreciation and more brand ambassadors for very little investment.
  • When you confirm attendance at an event, a press visit, whatever, send a press release and link to images as a matter of course even if it was sent with the initial pitch. If the blogger doesn’t need the info he/she can always delete. If it is needed, then this saves the person having to send an email request and would be much appreciated.
  • Want to build business on a slow night or off season? Consider inviting your favorite blogger friends to have an event for their readers. It introduces your shop, lounge, restaurant, hotel, whatever, to new people and at an investment that can be as little as paying for Prosecco and some light bites for two hours. The blogger might even be able to get the beverage donated.
  • Keep in mind partnering with bloggers on contests. Say it’s a travel sweepstakes, the hotel could give a two night stay and that’s all that it costs to get in front of the bloggers’ readers and get the participants’ contact info to build a mailing list. It’s a great way to build an opt-in list for eblasts.

And of course, there’s the cardinal rule of working with bloggers and any media – take the time to read it or see it (broadcast) before you pitch.. A pet peeve is always getting inappropriate mailings.

 

Gen Z and Media Habits

genz

 

They’re called Gen Z, the Centennials and the Homeland Generation (not sure why this name). They’re under 14 years old and their media habits and attitude toward content are the next logical steps in the world of digital media. Before reading an article on the topic by Scott Hess in Adweek, “Post Gen will Remake Our Media”, having seen the way this age group uses their phones and electronic toys, I anticipated some of these trends but was surprised by others. Here are the shifts:

 

  • With the ubiquitousness of advertising, one would think Gen Z would tune out, immune to their messages. Not necessarily so. They’re not immune if they’re not bored. They view advertising as another form of content. May the most interesting content win. The prize? Their attention.

 

  • Video, video, video. They’re highly visual and demand content be short.

 

  • In the competition for their attention, he who compels views now wins. The challenge is to motivate them to tune in, read, act right away or you’ve lost them. It’s all about urgency.

 

  • This one’s a surprise. They look to their Gen X parents to guide them in their content choices and consumption times. As Hess wrote, “Under 14 and under the tutelage of Gen X parents who themselves are massively adept at calendaring and multitasking, these Post Gen kids have given over the planning rei,ns entirely content to reside nose first in their devices until someone tells them otherwise.

 

  • It’s all about being real and being real means multicultural. “Post Gen won’t settle for a whitewashing”.

 

Photo courtesy of www.studenthousing.com

 

Foodie Crime

Cruffin

Cruffin

 

With the foodie craze on the consumer side commanding ever higher prices for restaurant meals especially in the form of tastings with wine pairings and on the other, the business side, opportunities for instant celebrity stardom, possible franchises or IPOs and the money that goes with it, foodie crime had to come.

And come it has. First, at Christmas 76 bottles of fine wine were stolen from Thomas Keller’s French Laundry restaurant north of San Francisco. The wine was valued at $300,000. And more recently all of the recipes were stolen from Mr.Holmes Bakery in San Francisco – recipes and nothing else. Why could this be? It turns out that Ry Stephen, a 28 year old pastry chef invented the cruffin, a muffin croissant hybrid that has created a frenzy in the city, much as the cronut did in New York. They sell out before the long line is gone. Selling at $4.50 each, the cruffin is said to take three days to make the ice cream cone shaped bakery item and comes filled with caramel, strawberry milkshake or Fluffernutter cream, among others.

Where will the foodie thieves strike next? Better put those recipes in a safe.

Photo courtesy of www.abc7news.com