Luxury Travel, Lifestyle and Marketing Trends

Director of Happiness and Travel

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Dubai, the Persian Gulf nation known in the travel world for the towering Burj al Arab hotel, the world’s biggest indoor ski slope, and an island that looks like a palm tree, is innovating once again with a newly announced Minister of State for Happiness. Though it’s more directed to its citizens, there’s no reason why it couldn’t set another precedent with a Director of Happiness for tourism. Think of the possibilities for destination marketing. From what I read, it would be the first.

I never heard about a Director of Happiness so went on a Google search to see what I could find in hospitality, travel, or in the business world in general. Surprise.  There are Directors of Happiness for employees, customers, and clients. And one site had a chart with the average salary for the job at $72K.  I even found a coach who specializes in happiness whose clients have included the likes of luxury brands Mont Blanc and Jaeger Le Coultre.

But let’s get back to travel and the opportunities there. I could see a destination naming a Director of Happiness as the centerpiece of a campaign to promote the idea that they go the extra mile to welcome travelers. It’d be a good publicity generator as well, provided that it’s part of a larger program that will show concrete results. Like what? First step would be  research to see what visitors would most appreciate. Friendlier locals? Meet the people type programs? More information kiosks? More public restrooms (that’d make a funny commentary)?  And think of the interview potential!

I was surprised in doing research that only one hotel has a happiness concierge – the Waidringer Hof in the Austrian Alps.
The job is described as a part concierge, guest attendant, and hiking guide. The mission: “Your pleasure is the centre of our strategy”.An admirable initiative, but needs to be more substantive.

So colleagues, you have an opportunity. And, finally, just in terms of interesting additional information, Dubai also named the Ministry of Cabinet Affairs as also having a new responsibility for “The Future”. I’d say the Director of Happiness should also be in charge of The Future wouldn’t you?

Millennial Slang to Know for 2016

Working with millennials or trying to reach them? Here’s a guide to millennial slang for 2016 so you can navigate the new lingo . And love to hear if you have anything to add.

1. Bae – short for babe, meaning your significant other
2. Crushing – doing it full steam
2. On Fleek – being “on fleek” means to be on point. In a business context, it means something was well executed and is worthy of acknowledgement.
3. Kill it – do something really well or with a lot of energy
4. Turn up – getting excited…Get Hyped, Wild, energetic”
5. Bootleg – not genuine, fake..Also it can be something not to the level expected or wanted
6. Basic – unoriginal or mainstream
7.  Throwing Shade –  the act of the underhanded insult being delivered. “Sarah threw shade at Melissa last night.”
8. Squad – group of close friends
9. Sick – something is awesome or really fun.
10. Fire – if something is good (usually food/beverage) then it’s fire.

BONUS:  ¯\_(?)_/¯” is the new emoji which is a man shrugging their shoulders signifying “I dunno” or not my fault.

Reprinted from MiamiCurated

Key Takeaways from Travel Blogger Exchange ’15

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Key takeaways from the recent TBEX(Travel Blogger Exchange) North America 2015 Conference in Fort Lauderdale. Attracting an international group of travel bloggers, writers, new media content creators, and social media savvy travel industry professionals, TBEX  is the world’s largest conference and networking event for online travel journalists and travel industry companies. Facts, figures, and tips to keep in mind:

Key Takeaways

  • Why Travel Brands Must Embrace Visual Storytelling
    • Data shows that 71% of travelers search for a destination on YouTube before booking to see the visual appeal
    • Good examples of brands using the tools of video and photography to their advantage:
      • Marriott created a GoPro rental package and encouraged guests to videotape their trip
      • The 1888 Hotel in Sydney allowed for anyone with over 50,000 Instagram followers to have a free night (because they have such a large visual following.)
  • Have brand hashtags readily available for guests to access (no longer than 15 characters)
  • Less than 10% of travel brands have videos on their Facebook – this is a huge opportunity for brands to expand upon
  • Platforms to utilize social media:
    • Socialbakers monitors how the competition promotes their content, how it performs, and start reaching bigger audience on social
    • Periscope is an emerging video social platform brands should begin utilizing

 

Working with Travel Bloggers from a Company Perspective

  • Pin articles to a brand’s Pinterest account to expand their reach
  • Airlines will very rarely comp flights because of the margin
  • Bloggers want evergreen content that will continue to generate impressions (a win/win for a company because they will generate sales)
  • Blogs are the third most influential digital resources (31%) when making overall purchases, behind retail sites (56%) and brand sites (34%) according to Technorati
  • “Nearly half of travelers have changed or decided upon a trip because of what they read on social media” – WTTC

 

Travel Reviews

  • Everything is based on a review in this day and age
  • We live in a review culture (i.e. someone looks to their favorite travel blog for hotel recommendations)
  • Credibility is the number one factor of bloggers gaining readers, developing their voice and showing their professionalism
  • As part of a blogger’s editing checklist, they want to be a correct resource (i.e. it’s OK as a brand/PR representative to ask them to correct a story if the information is out of date)

Photo courtesy of www.fathomaway.com

5 Not so Obvious Do’s and Don’ts with Bloggers

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Though I’ve had KWE Partners blog for many years, mostly a B2B audience, being on the consumer blogging side with MiamiCurated (69K+ UVM according to Cision media database) has opened my eyes to several Best Practices that are often overlooked by products and services. Here are 5 tips from my first hand experience:

 

  • Do not prohibit bloggers from taking photos or require them to get approvals from PR execs to take them. This might seem obvious in a social media world, but it isn’t in practice. Case in point. As a courtesy, I always introduce myself when I go to a place and want to take pictures. The other day I went to a men’s shoe store, spoke with the manager, introduced myself, and proceeded to take pictures. He said I wasn’t permitted without getting the PR department’s approval. No writeup for them.
  • Recently I learned of a blogger’s loyalty program to encourage purchases of the product. What a wonderful idea. Think of giving a discount to bloggers who sign up as a perk – you’ll earn their appreciation and more brand ambassadors for very little investment.
  • When you confirm attendance at an event, a press visit, whatever, send a press release and link to images as a matter of course even if it was sent with the initial pitch. If the blogger doesn’t need the info he/she can always delete. If it is needed, then this saves the person having to send an email request and would be much appreciated.
  • Want to build business on a slow night or off season? Consider inviting your favorite blogger friends to have an event for their readers. It introduces your shop, lounge, restaurant, hotel, whatever, to new people and at an investment that can be as little as paying for Prosecco and some light bites for two hours. The blogger might even be able to get the beverage donated.
  • Keep in mind partnering with bloggers on contests. Say it’s a travel sweepstakes, the hotel could give a two night stay and that’s all that it costs to get in front of the bloggers’ readers and get the participants’ contact info to build a mailing list. It’s a great way to build an opt-in list for eblasts.

And of course, there’s the cardinal rule of working with bloggers and any media – take the time to read it or see it (broadcast) before you pitch.. A pet peeve is always getting inappropriate mailings.

 

A Brilliant Promotion: Miami Beach

kwe blog miami beach promotion

 

An ideal promotion that’s a homerun has several elements:

  • It enables consumer sampling
  • It’s a public service
  • The appeal is to all ages and demographics
  • It’s low cost or no cost and is self sustaining

And so, one of the best promotions I’ve heard about of late is between Miami Beach tourism, the Mount Sinai Medical Center and Destination Brands.

The proposition: 50 dispensers to distribute sunscreen lotion will be installed at different Miami Beach public pools, parks and beach access points near lifeguard stands. The sunscreen is free for anyone visiting the beach. The specific brand is MB Miami Beach SPF  30 Triple Aciton Sea Kelp lotion. This Miami Beach brand of lotion was launched last year by Destination Brands to capitalize on the Beach’s brand and tie in with the city’s Centennial celebration this year. The product, part of a line, is also sold in retail shops in Miami Beach and  in some markets abroad.

Mount Sinai invested $25,000 to fund the dispensers. Destination Brands funds the sunscreen through revenues from the MB lotion sales.

The Beach gests a percentage of the sales revenue from this year.  “It’s an opportunity for us to increase our brand awareness and generate some revenue,” said Max Sklar, director of the Beach’s tourism, culture and economic development in an article in the Miami Herald.

Sounds like a win-win-win for everyone.

 

Photo courtesy of miamiherald.com

Gen Z and Media Habits

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They’re called Gen Z, the Centennials and the Homeland Generation (not sure why this name). They’re under 14 years old and their media habits and attitude toward content are the next logical steps in the world of digital media. Before reading an article on the topic by Scott Hess in Adweek, “Post Gen will Remake Our Media”, having seen the way this age group uses their phones and electronic toys, I anticipated some of these trends but was surprised by others. Here are the shifts:

 

  • With the ubiquitousness of advertising, one would think Gen Z would tune out, immune to their messages. Not necessarily so. They’re not immune if they’re not bored. They view advertising as another form of content. May the most interesting content win. The prize? Their attention.

 

  • Video, video, video. They’re highly visual and demand content be short.

 

  • In the competition for their attention, he who compels views now wins. The challenge is to motivate them to tune in, read, act right away or you’ve lost them. It’s all about urgency.

 

  • This one’s a surprise. They look to their Gen X parents to guide them in their content choices and consumption times. As Hess wrote, “Under 14 and under the tutelage of Gen X parents who themselves are massively adept at calendaring and multitasking, these Post Gen kids have given over the planning rei,ns entirely content to reside nose first in their devices until someone tells them otherwise.

 

  • It’s all about being real and being real means multicultural. “Post Gen won’t settle for a whitewashing”.

 

Photo courtesy of www.studenthousing.com